Category Archives: portraits

interview series: Kylie Streed

kylie streed - jamiemulhern.com

I met Kylie at our mutual friend Brian’s party. Kylie and I were sitting by each other on the couch commiserating about our gluten free lifestyle. We were both eyeballing the cookies while making chit chat. She mentioned she was a hairstylist, and I reported I had just that week gotten my hair cut. I had my hair pulled back and also was wearing a hat. I dutifully showed her what I was feeling rather apathetic about and she responded by saying we should cut it! I agreed!

She cut my hair with regular scissors in the hallway at Brian’s house in the middle of a party. I love her spontaneity and her infectious laugh. She’s a warm and caring person who is now my new hair stylist!

kylie streed - jamiemulhern.com

kylie streed - jamiemulhern.com

Jamie: Tell us a little about yourself.

Kylie: I was born and raised in sunny southern California, but now I choose to call Portland my home.  I’ve been specializing in men’s haircuts for a little over eight years.  I feel like the luckiest person alive because I get to make a living doing pretty much my favorite thing in the world.  I also love to read; I have at least three books dog-eared at any given time.  That’s right– books.  The Kindle makes me nervous and doesn’t smell nearly as good as ink on fresh paper.

kylie streed - jamiemulhern.com

Jamie: Southern California and Portland, Oregon are practically complete opposites in some ways, yet really similar in others. What do you love about both places? And what do you miss most about SoCal? I’d love to know about some of your favorites places and restaurants too!

Kylie: They really are so different from each other.  That’s what’s so nice about still having family in California.  I get to enjoy for a few days and then come back to reality– kind of like playing with my friends’ kids.  I love the warmth and smell of California.  Maybe my olfactory system is super sensitive, but I think all places have a unique smell.  I love that in Portland, you can walk to your neighborhood theatre and watch the Country Music Awards or just a basketball game with fellow beer drinkers.  There’s such a strong sense of community here.  What I miss most about where I grew up is the Mexican food!  not many things are fried in lard up here in the northwest, unfortunately.  I did find one restaurant that comes pretty close to SoCal- There’s a divey little joint on East Burnside called Ole Ole. The tacos are to die for and very affordable!  Which is good, because everyone in Portland is either retired or working on their doctorate.  Another place I love specializes in Ethiopian cuisine.  No jokes, please.  It’s called Bete-Lukas.  The owner is a kick and the food is always fresh and delicious.  And because I have three stomachs, I can’t forget about dessert.  Rimsky-Korsakoffee House in the Buckman area is as out there as it gets.  Incredible and interesting hand crafted pies and coffees.  But, beware of the bathrooms- that’s all I’ll say.

kylie streed - jamiemulhern.com

Jamie:  I thought I was a die hard paper book person too, but my friend Jill gave me a Kindle, and I was surprised how much I do like it! It’s been a lifesaver living in a small place. Haha! What kind of books do you read?

Kylie: I’ll read pretty much anything that I’m given or is recommended to me.  I get a lot of books as gifts. It’s pretty interesting to see what people come up with.  You can always tell what kind of person someone thinks you are by the books they give you.  Chuck Pahlaniuk is my favorite author, so I’ve read all of his work.  You may know him from such titles as, “Fight Club.”  I’m really into science fiction and memoirs.  I’m just fascinated by humans; I’ll read anyone’s story.

kylie streed - jamiemulhern.com

Jamie: You seem like a brave and fearless person. Does anything scare you?

Kylie: Turning thirty!  No, but seriously, a few things do.  I’ve always been deathly afraid of heights.  Once I’m at 30,000 feet on an airplane I can relax–sort of.  But skyscrapers…forget it.  I also have a healthy fear of large dogs; it stems from some sort of childhood canine trauma, I’m sure.

kylie streed - jamiemulhern.com

Jamie: I used to love flying, but I like it less and less these days. I do like heights though. They remind me of dreams I have had in which I can fly. But let’s circle back around to the hair cutting thing: when did you get interested in hair cutting? And why are you specialized in men’s hair? What inspires you? Tell me all the things!

Kylie: Do you ever fall in your flying dreams?  I heard that’s good luck!  Hair cutting…let’s see. I’ve been fascinated with the entire beautification process for as long as I can remember.  When my parents would have guests over, I’d walk around the room and paint everyone’s fingernails.  I’m sure I did great work at four years old!  

Whenever my dad would go in to get his hair cut, even if it was early in the morning, I’d go with him.  I’d sit in the lobby and watch intently.  I loved the sound of the shears snipping the hair and how effortless and graceful the stylists looked while working.  Later in life, I was always the first in the house to notice when Dad came home with a fresh haircut.  His face looked brighter and he seemed to have a spring in his step.  Men’s hair holds my interest because of the precision involved in cutting, and even styling it.  Women’s hair is fun to look at and play with, but the technician in me loves dealing with tight shapes and weight lines.  It’s also fun to show a man that a good haircut really can make a difference in how he feels and even acts.  I feel that the extra time and attention I’m able to devote to my clients gives them a certain confidence and dare I say…swagger?  

I love to flip through cheesy magazines like US Weekly to see what the “beautiful people” of the world are doing with their hair.  Since my shop is in a men’s clothing store, I also draw a lot of inspiration from expensive suits.  I like to give my clients a haircut that will enhance their style and maybe even get them to switch from a polo to a nice sport coat.

kylie streed - jamiemulhern.com

Jamie: Would you like to share some internet links?

Kylie: www.facebook.com/hairbykyliestreed

www.schedulicity.com (online scheduling.)

http://www.yelp.com/biz/hair-by-kylie-portland

kylie streed - jamiemulhern.com

 

Thanks to Kylie for participating in my interview series! If you have any questions for her, ask in the comments below! (And go get a hair cut!)

Interview Series: Corey Pressman

I first met Corey at the sausage making class at Portland Homestead Supply. He was the instructor but seemed more like a host of a party. (If you get a chance, you really should take his class. It’s like an intimate dinner party where you get to help make the food.)

The thing about Corey is he is one of those clever and charming people that you feel like you’ve known forever. He’s a great conversationalist and super intelligent.

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Jamie: Please tell us a little about yourself.

Corey: You can never step in the same stream twice.

Jamie: I’ve never had anyone answer that first question so succinctly. I am curious to know the journey of an anthropology professor into a software design and development founder. I picture one as a nutty professor of sorts, surrounded by cobwebs, dust, and musty books. Perhaps with an old desktop that is terribly out-of-date. While the other person has a pristine Apple laptop, wears a hoodie, and goes to “meetings” at coffee houses. How did that transition happen? (And don’t destroy my illusions of what an anthropology professor is like if you can.)

Corey:  Actually, being an anthropology professor prepared me well for a life of software design.  Anthropology’s focus on culture and ethnographic field methods have been somewhat co-opted by the user experience industry.  Also, delivering over 4,500 hours of lectures prepares one for speaking at conferences – something I do quite often. This is my main form of marketing.  Lastly, my talks, blog posts, and approach to digital strategy and design all derive from historical and anthropological research about things like stone tools, cave art, and medieval scrolls.  So – I’m still a nutty professor, writing pedantic and oblique blog posts, surrounded by musty books.  I do, however, have a shiny Macbook Air and meet with clients at Heart Coffee Roasters.  No cobwebs, however.  And hoodies are for hipsters and children.

corey pressman - jamie carey mulhern
Jamie: You told us a lovely story about “becoming a foodie” in the Sausage Making class I took at Portland Homestead Supply. Would you mind sharing that story again here?

Corey:  I had been a line cook on and off for a few years.  However, I did not yet understand the magical aspect of food.  It was a meal at Wildwood on NW 21st – it had just opened and there was a real buzz about the place.  

I remember the dish being set in front of me: bacon wrapped trout on a bed of lentils.  Simple enough.  But it was symphonic – an astonishment.  The woodsmoke of the bacon, the texture of trout.  And the lentils were all nose –  so complex and perfect that I can STILL taste them.  I put my fork down after a few bites, took a deep breath, and wiped away tears.  That was when I realized I knew nothing about food.  

I’ve been trying to learn a little something of that magic ever since.

corey pressman - jamie carey mulhern

Jamie: So if you had a perfect food day in Portland, what would that look like?

Corey: The perfect food day – love the concept.  It would start at home with a hot mug of black Heart coffee made in a french press.  I would fry eggs in walnut oil and an eventual splash of moscatel vinegar (cooked off), salt, pepper.  This is eaten with good toast and enjoyed with the wife and children.  Lunch at Olympic Provisions – probably one of Joe’s genius soups (beet!), a green salad, and a glass of white.  Snack of nuts and chocolate at 3:00.  Dinner with the fam at Navarre.  Stinky wine, greens, rabbit, mussels, white beans.  Right before bed, I smother a banana with peanut butter and eat this over the sink, breathing out of my nose.

Jamie: Haha! That last part! Would you like to share some internet links?

Corey: http://pdx.eater.com/

http://www.olympicprovisions.com/

http://www.homesteadsupplyco.com/

 

Big thanks to Corey for participating in my series! I really appreciate him answering my questions. If you think of more, ask them in the comments, I’d be happy to pass them along.

knitting: driftwood

So I FINALLY finished this sweater. I have been working on it since September of last year. Not that I knit that slowly, but I was also working on another lace weight sweater at the same time. And the holidays, and then packing, and moving, oh and a beaded shawl

striped driftwood

It’s a gorgeous pattern called Driftwood by a designer I admire named Isabell Kraemer. She has a blog here. I knit mine up with Rowan’s Creative Linen which is a 50/50 blend of cotton and linen that I purchased from Wildfiber in Los Angeles. It’s kind of my spring sweater, really comfy and casual. I originally sewed on some mother of pearl shell buttons, but decided with some turquoise plastic buttons so I could throw this thing in the washer and dryer.

So yay! It’s finally done!!!

Interview Series: Sarah Heath

I’m excited to bring you my first Portland interview! Sarah was one of the first people I met when we moved into the Sellwood neighborhood. She was at the meeting the neighbors held to discuss the mural design for the Sherrett Square intersection. She showed up without shoes on in late March, and my curiosity was piqued!

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Jamie: Tell us a little about yourself.

Sarah: I’m a 23 year old artist and playful living extraordinaire! I spend my days working on creative and collaborative projects and try to be as helpful and goofy as possible! I believe that the best way to inspire others to do good in the world is to live your truth. I love graphic novels, harmonizing, loukoumades, and playing my soul sport ultimate Frisbee.

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Jamie: I’d really like to know more about your barefoot philosophy-how did you get into it? Do you ride your bike without shoes? Do you go into restaurants without them?

Sarah: Well sure! It all began many years ago down in the Rogue Valley where I grew up. We lived on a few acres of land surrounded by meadows with views of mountain ranges and I’d spend hours upon hours romping around in “the back 40” unshod. My mom would insist that I wear shoes, but after many futile attempts, she finally conceded to allow me to play without a scolding because I’d never listen. Going barefoot wasn’t even a question. It just made sense. It felt right.

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I wore shoes or sandals in public places when I had to and at school. Shoes became more of an installation in my life during my high school years what with sports and the desire to fit in being larger factors. At some point, I started to realize how odd and almost nonexistent it was for adults to walk around outside of the house without shoes. This was troubling because I felt the most like myself, I felt the most comfortable barefoot, and I didn’t want to be chastised or gawked at for it. At that time I was getting into film and I thought it would be a great documentary topic from a social commentary point of view. I began researching feet and barefooting and discovered that there were several organizations that were totally dedicated to barefooting, which was awesome! I also discovered that many myths surrounding laws and the dangers of going barefoot in our modern societies were false.

I shelved the idea for a while, but kept coming back to it excitedly. While at university, my activist fires were ignited and with my new found confidence I felt empowered to be more vocal and active in my barefooting. I gradually moved almost completely away from shoes and over the past couple of years have been working on the preproduction of my documentary film Foot.

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All of the research I’ve done over the years has expanded my knowledge of the scientific and health related reasons for going barefoot, but the deeper truth was there all along. I knew it as a child, as I think we all inherently know it. When we go the beach or park and slip off our shoes without a thought, instinctually gripping at the sun warmed sand or luscious grass beneath us. Our bodies and hearts know that it’s good because it’s how we come in to the world to experience it. It’s how we connect to everything. To the past, present, and future. To life!

I try to be barefoot as much as I can, but I usually bring sandals with me if I know I’ll be going into buildings that may have an issue with being barefoot. I’ve asked all of the places I frequent and about half of them are fine with me coming in unshod. Usually it’s liability that folks are worried about which is unfortunate. I do bike without shoes. Two summers ago I biked to the coast barefoot!

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Jamie: You are onto something there with the idea about instinct for sure. When we truly connect with nature, we do instinctually take off our shoes. But what about winter? Don’t your feet get cold? And in this climate in particular, a lot of people take off their shoes when entering a house, how do you navigate that custom if your feet are wet or muddy?

Sarah: People who live primarily barefoot actually have warmer feet because their circulation is better. When you use all of the muscles in your feet to support and move your entire body instead of relying on the support of shoes, your feet demand more blood flow which your heart is happy to provide. A lot of times in the winter I’ll start out with wool socks in sandals and a half hour later I need to take them off because my feet are too hot. This isn’t always possible as it does get very cold and wet in a lot of places, so I do wear wool socks with sandals or shoes that I make. I’m crafty and love tedious projects, but there are handcrafted moccasin-like shoe producers out there. The closest to Portland I know of is in Corvallis and they are named Soft Star Shoes. (Website below). They’re really wonderful!

As far as going into homes goes, feet are much easier to clean than shoes for one thing, so it’s usually enough to just wipe on the doormat a few times. If it’s particularly mucky out, I may bring along a hand towel just in case, or I’ll ask for one when I arrive. Also grass is a great bath and mat all in one!

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Jamie:  I am also very interested in the work you do with the Planet Repair Institute. Could you talk a little about that? (And in particular, the project you did about making your bed!)

Sarah: Sure. Well PRI is the home I share with four others as well as a demonstration site and permaculture school. We all work together on experimenting with all kinds of urban homesteading projects such as growing our own food, installing rainwater catchment and other water systems, straw-clay insulation, and community asset sharing. Every year we participate in the Village Building Convergence as a site and we host a 15 day Permaculture Design Course that’s spread out over several months in the summer and fall. We all also have our own projects outside of the house, but at the same time are all very invested in this place. Mostly we’re all very interested in exploring ways in which we can sustain our needs at home, instead of outsourcing them and spending most of our lives apart from the place and people we love.

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My bed project is expanded upon on our blog listed below, but basically I needed a new bed one day and didn’t want to purchase one because beds are weird and chemically and I have no idea where or how they’re made. So I thought, “why not make one!? How hard could it be?” Fortunately because we do a lot of building around here, we had all of the tools and spare lumber for the job. I did source some nice scrap untreated cotton canvas for the mattress and bought some localish straw to stuff it with.

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I love making my own things. It’s one of the most satisfying activities to partake in. I’m so incredibly grateful to have the opportunity to spend a large portion of my days making my own furniture, clothing, food, and artwork instead of performing ultimately meaningless tasks for someone else hours on end so that I can pay for yet another person to provide for my needs. It’s not perfect, certainly not always so dandy or easy, but it is always rich and meaningful. And that’s what matters.

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Jamie: Would you share some of your favorite internet links?

Sarah: http://www.softstarshoes.com/ – Awesome shoe company in Oregon

http://www.barefooters.org/ – The society for barefoot living’s homepage   

www.planetrepair.org – Permaculture demonstration site and home

http://cityrepair.org/ – Great Portland organization that puts on the Village Building Convergence

www.gardensglory.com – My garden inspired earring website

http://www.taprootmag.com/ – A magazine that I really love!

Look out soon for my film’s website!

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Thank you so much, Sarah, for taking the time to answer my questions! You are so interesting, and this interview only scratches the surface. Please everyone reading this, feel free to ask her more questions, and I will make sure she sees your comments.

portland photography: new baby

My beautiful friend Tara invited me to photograph her newest family member’s birth day. For me, words can’t really describe an event like this. Tara was magical and strong. Her new baby boy is full of possibility.

tara + baby

 

You can see more photos on my facebook page here. (SFW)

Portland Photography: Lake Grove Upholstery

I grew up with a mother who loved antiques. For a time, she even ran a large Antique Warehouse on Apache and McClintock in Tempe, Arizona called Cheap Antiques. It was huge: one of those buildings filled with different vendors and rooms. It was unlike any other I’ve been in since though. The back section of the warehouse was a workspace for certain employees to refurnish the some antiques. I used to watch in awe as they dipped heavy pieces into an industrial sized tub to remove all the varnish. It smelled like stripper, oil, and wood shavings back there. I loved it.

It’s been a long time since then; my mother has long since changed careers, but I did inherit a couple of large chairs that wouldn’t quite fit into her house the way she wanted. I lugged them all the way up here to Portland. (Thanks David! I know they were heavy!)

One of the chairs in particular has always been ugly. The fabric on it, I just don’t even know how to describe it. Colorful?

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I have provided evidence with a “vintage” photo of me and my cat taking a nap on it. As you can tell, it is comfortable. Definitely worth saving. MAKEOVER MONTAGE! (Just kidding, although if I already had photos of the after…sorry you will have to wait. JUST.LIKE.ME.

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I took it to my local reupholster-er. These folks are legit. Alexander Baghdanov is the third generation in his family to practice this business. His wife Lyubov runs the front desk, and his children work in the shop as well. They have beautiful accents and are wonderfully friendly.

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Part of what they do is give the furniture a little love. I look forward to seeing how they salvage what my mother’s pug pack did to this arm.

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Alexander Bagdanov

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There are A MILLION FABRIC SAMPLES. It was so hard to decide. But I finally did. EEEEEEEE!

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I hope to have the “after” photos in another week or so!

 

 

interview series! corbin chamberlin!

“You can never be overdressed or over educated.”

-Oscar Wilde

I met Corbin sometime in the past few years in my time at Liberty Market. He’s a regular customer whenever he’s in town. You can often catch him on his laptop or having a meeting over coffee. He makes me laugh, and he challenges me as a friend. Also, he has fabulous hair.

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Jamie: Tell us a little about yourself.
Corbin: Arizona native. Can’t get enough coffee, carbs and expensive silk scarves. I’m a fashion writer (The New York Times, Newsweek/The Daily Beast and an editor at the New York Observer’s SCENE Magazine). In addition, I’m working on two books at the moment. I’m an advocate for long dinner parties, pricey perfume and late-in-the-hour consumption of ice cream. Overall nice guy with a soft-spot for outcasts, misfits and troublemakers.

Jamie: I’m curious about your fashion history. Were you a toddler born with all the right tastes who demanded to dress yourself or was this something that more slowly developed?
Corbin: I’m really fortunate to have a ultra-stylish mother and grandmother. I was always concerned about what I was wearing, but I wouldn’t consider it fashionable or stylish. I had a uniform; oxford shirt, bow-tie and vest.

Jamie: What’s the most embarrassing thing you’ve ever worn?
Corbin: I’ve worn a lot of outrageous items (long fur coats, capes and caftans) to suburban-spots outside of the anything-goes-streets of New York City and haven’t felt embarrassed, rather a tad overdressed. Perhaps I blushed a bit when I ran into a very important editor-in-chief in the hallway of a hotel in L.A while wearing gym clothes.

Jamie: Gym clothes are one of those necessary evils, aren’t they? What advice do you have for the average suburban American? What to wear? What not to wear?
Corbin: I suppose gym clothes are a necessary evil– after all the gym is hell. The best advice I can give is that once you’re done with your spin class, go home and change. No one wants to see you in sweaty-spandex at the market, really there are no good excuses. I’m in LOVE with the fitness gear from Nike. It’s the gym, not a the Oscars– just keep it basic, modest and clean.

Jamie: Have you ever met Stacy and Clinton?
Corbin: I’m sorry, who? Doesn’t ring a bell.

Jamie: Would you like to share some internet links?
Corbin: Well, you should read the following everyday…
www.sceneinny.com
www.elle.com
www.thedailybeast.com

And follow these divine individuals on Twitter. .
@PeterDavisNYC
@DrrrAmina
@BryanBoy
@NicoletteMason

Also find me at @Corbin_C and corbinchamberlin.tumblr.com for my constant mischief making.

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(photo provided by Corbin)

Thanks again Corbin for participating in my interview series! If you have any questions for him, please ask away in the comments!

 

flying blanket studios


(image above: Bob Hoag in the booth)

I got a call from my friend Krystofer who was laying down some tracks for an album at a small recording studio in Mesa, Arizona called Flying Blanket Recording. It was so beautiful inside!

There were little vignettes of mid century modern furniture, doorknobs, and music equipment all over the building. The converted building was built in 1947.

See my whole album here on flickr.


(photo above: credit Chanelle Sinclair)